Facebook – Some Additional Ideas to Improve Your Experience Part 2

Last week’s blog post about Getting Around Facebook’s Algorithms really seemed to help people. The most important thing to take away from that conversation was “engagement.” Like, comment, interact with people on Facebook. Don’t just smile and move on. If you see something you like, engage with it and you’ll pop up more on algorithms and start seeing more of the things you want to see.

Now, some other ways to help:

Problem: Why does it take hours for me to see my good friend’s post?
Solution: This could be because you’ve selected Top Stories versus Most Recent on your news feed. In the top left of your screen (on a PC) You will see a running list of options: Under your profile/name, it will say News Feed. To the right of that you will see a little arrow. Click on the downward arrow and see if you’ve selected either Top Stories, or Most Recent. Top stories will mean you will get served more posts that OTHER people have liked and commented on. FB thinks these are “top/important” stories and will give you those. If you wish to see things a little closer to live time, hit recent stories.

Issue, some friends say that they do hit recent stories, yet their friends and family still don’t see their posts often. Well guess what? Per my “inside friends who work with Facebook” it could be two things. A) Your friends also need to click recent stories as well as a selection. b) If you are not signed on, and occasionally sign in and out, that affects the algorithm timing as when things will pop up. It won’t just automatically do it – you’re in a queue (line) so to speak.

One note of caution, sometimes FB will switch your selection from Most Recent back to Top Stories. I don’t know why, and it’s happened to a few people I know, and myself, so every now and then just check.

Problem: Why do some Author Posts get more hits than others?
Solution: Well, that depends. Last week we discussed why only a small % of our fans see our pages. That they must engage with our content in order to get served our posts more, and thus, why we need to boost our posts occasionally. I have another solution. Authors, go to your Fan page. On the top are bars and click on “See Insights.” Then scroll down and look at your last 5 posts. You can see the type of engagement you had for specific posts. Did you put in a link? Did you put in a picture? You can see the TYPE of activity your fans did. Did they like it? Did they comment? Did they share it? See below for an example. As you can see, when I boosted my post (in this case I targeted just my fans and their friends), you can see how many more people engaged and commented and the reach.

fbstats

I would suggest you try a few things… Don’t inundate your fans and space this up since you don’t want to be spammy, but how about post 2 covers and ask your fans which ones they like better? Another post, put in a blurb and link to your book, another post just do a regular post with no links or photos. Then do another one with just information about the book BUT now put the link in the comments section. Then, finally, boost a post. Then go back and look at this analysis page and see what worked and what got the most engagement. You’ll be surprised. I’ve found that most people will respond better to a photo and a question, then to a book link.

Not to mention, Facebook seems to despise links to our books. For some reason I get much less awareness by FB to my fans when I do a link, versus do a photo. Facebook really doesn’t want authors to post links and drive people AWAY from the Facebook experience (hence, I suggest putting the link in the comments section).

So, try these two tips out and see if they work! Love to hear some other ideas from everyone as well.

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9 thoughts on “Facebook – Some Additional Ideas to Improve Your Experience Part 2

    • I honestly don’t know – I was told that if your friends also sigh on and off, their own queue is affected too – so I think on their end they won’t see your posts as live time either, because it was live when they weren’t signed in… basically the experience is controlled two ways. Via you and your friends. It’s tough.

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